Creating Personal Connections in a Digital World

Creating Personal Connections in a Digital World

Over the last 20 years, advances in technology have affected nearly every aspect of our lives. Think about it. Two decades ago, VHS tapes were still popular. Now survey a group of millennials or Gen Z and most will look at you with puzzled faces. Our cell phones were limited to SMS and phone calls (or if you were lucky, a rousing game of snake) and now we can find the answer to almost any question in a matter of seconds on the supercomputers in our pockets. We had to wait a week to watch the next episode of our favorite TV show. Now we can binge an entire season in one weekend. We can purchase almost anything in the world with the click of a few buttons instead of driving to the store. Have I made myself seem old yet?

However, in the midst of all these advancements we started to lose something. The personal connection that is created when people interact face-to-face or even just talking on the phone. Sometimes those bonds aren’t necessary to make the sale. But many industries such as real estate, automobile, and most B2B services rely on those personal connections. The impression that you leave on a client can make all the difference in completing the sale. So, as the world continues to push toward an even more technologically reliant society, it’s important to begin building those personal connections digitally. Here are some tips to get started.

Segment your target market and tailor your messaging

All of your customers are not the same, so don’t treat them like it. Segment your target audience into a few categories with similar personalities, beliefs, or purchase behavior. Then tailor your messaging to each one separately. For example, let’s say that I am on a Chevy emailing list. If records show that I have only purchased trucks in the past, do you think I want to learn all about the new 2020 sedan? Probably not.

With an effectively segmented target market, you can tailor the benefits of your product to speak to each generation. Core values change over time. One generation may favor efficiency and money-saving messaging while another generation favors an environmentally-friendly message. Your message should resonate deeply with the people you are trying to connect with.

Have a personality

Every day there are millions of companies fighting for people’s attention on social media. In that sea of businesses using the same bland tone, it’s your job to stand out. Have a personality, tell a joke, post a picture of your sales team dressed up in dinosaur costumes chasing the human resources department. What is your newsfeed like now? I bet it’s something like, *political post* *COVID19 post* *political post* *fake news post* etc. So, what happens when you post that picture as your future customer is scrolling through everything else. It catches their attention, they laugh, they smile, they click like and maybe a share, and you’ve started creating a connection.

Funnel customers toward a face-to-face meeting

You can have a perfectly planned out digital marketing strategy, a glowing personality online, and brilliantly tailored messages but sometimes you need a smile, a real voice, and that face-to-face human interaction to make a customer. This is preferably done in-person but as many have learned during this COVID era, a video conference call is a close second. It enables you to put a face to your company and really demonstrate your expertise.

Understand that nearly all of your connections are going to begin in the digital realm. Before requesting that proposal, or more information they are going to look at your website or your social media, or both. The more effective you can begin that connection through digital outlets the more likely they will be to purchase from you. As a digital marketing agency, Decibel Blue has the knowledge and experience to help you build, refine, and implement a strategy to build those connections.

Carson Renstrom

Carson Renstrom brings a lifetime of experience in online and traditional marketing for his family’s catering business. After taking a break to serve in intelligence in the Naval Reserve and work in a nuclear submarine, he has recently returned to his marketing roots.

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